ETHICAL MANUFACTURING

We genuinely care who and how our clothing is made. Isle of Summer is not a mass produced label and we never want to be.

"We believe that no person, especially women and children, should be disadvantage in the manufacturing of our clothing."

All of our collections are made in small limited edition quantities, with people and planet in mind.

 

 OUR TEAM

WHO MAKES OUR CLOTHES?

We've proudly partnered with S&F Garment Manufacturers for our Summer'21 collection.

S&F is an Australian-owned and managed manufacturer in Bali and upholds our high standards of ethical manufacturing.

All workers are paid well above a living wage, receive health care and insurance benefits, are provided educational studies and have been receiving food packages during Covid.

VISIT S&F GARMENT MANUFACTURING

 GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF TRADE

We have a list of guiding principles of trade we expect all manufacturing partners and suppliers to meet, whether they are in Australia or abroad:

  • Pays staff above the local minimum wage and is compliant with local laws and tax regulations
  • Has a safe and clean workplace free of sexual harassment and bullying 
  • Does not exploit or use children 
  • Considers their environmental impact at all stages of manufacturing
  • Zero tolerance policy to the unauthorised use of any sub contractor within our supply chain
  • Committed to transparency and open communication 

 "Our makers are the most important part of our business so it is critical we partner with a team who love their jobs, because happy employees create beautiful quality products."

 

AN ONGOING PROCESS

SUSTAINABLE FABRICS

Sustainability is important to our brand and we're always researching new fabric technologies that reduce the impact on our plant. However, as a small business not wanting to mass produce our clothing, it has been difficult to access certified sustainable fabrics.

We're not afraid to ask our fabric suppliers all the hard questions and will walk away from beautiful fabrics if we don't feel there is enough transparency around how the fabric was made.

We are also moving towards using digital as our preferred method of fabric printing. It uses the least amount of water in the printing process, is better for the environment and allows us to not be pushed into overconsumption.